About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN2 16
CSPAN 11
WHUT (Howard University Television) 10
CNN 6
WETA 6
KQED (PBS) 5
WMPT (PBS) 4
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 68
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest: sure. first of all, i think it's really important in terms of context of my work, entalk about unintended consequences, good intentions, but yields bad outcomes. what i've done in the book is focus on the three key ingredients. those are capital, basically money, labor, which is basically the work force, and then fina
nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head toward the front lines. we were watching rebels head to an area where they believe they have liberated m
sure the u.s. and european countries are on the right track. >> host: is almost like there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west. the rise of the east, and i guess the basic premise is that the lines are going to cross. >> you can argue that there is an absolute part talking about the west and its isolation and with the issues are going on there and of course we live in an easing time when china and the other emerging economies have done the unthinkable moving these people of poverty so it is going to be in the year relevant question as well which is what i have done in the book. >> let's start by talking about what is going on in the west. >> guest: sure. i think it's important that in terms of the context of my work i talked about the unintended consequences, things that seemingly undersurface from the good intention but actually yield bad outcomes and what i've done in this book is to focus on the three key ingredients that economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and those are capital which is basically money. lieber
fighters are being easily out maneuvered. >> it is being reported in the u.s. that president obama signed a secret presidential order in the past three weeks authorizing covert support for opposition forces who have been trying to topple colnel gadhafi. news coming amid a debate of arming the forces opposed to colnel gadhafi. >> the details are fairly sketchy to be honest. we have had confirmation tonight that over the past two or three weeks president obama signed what is called a presidential finding, essentially a directive that paves the way for covert military operations to take place in libya by american forces aiding the rebel forces. there are reports in the "new york times" saying c.i.a. is already in libya, which i don't think some will find too surprising. but so far the white house and c.i.a., as you would expect, refused to comment. >> interesting to point out that we are being told that government sources confirming that barack obama signed this operation some two or three weeks ago, which is interesting because we heard from him last night talking about arming rebels in the
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
likely is it will you jump out of your parent's income group? the u.s. did surprisingly poorly coming in behind denmark, norway, sweden, germany, france, canada. two other such studies confirmed this reality. now, i know what my perception is about america. anyone can make it here, and there are lots of high-profile examples of that. but those are anecdotes. the facts say that for the average joe in recent years social mobility has slowed and other countries have moved ahead. similarly among rich countries over the last 25 years our growth rate per person has not been the strongest. now there are clearly places where we are still number one and the number of guns we own far exceeds any other country. we account for 50% of the world's annual production of weapons. we are number one in terms of our total debt to other countries, but there are really many positive places where we are still number one. that's what i began by listing. but my point is the picture today is a lot more mixed than boastful rhetoric about america is number one suggests. the question i have really is what would i
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
on the security council. president obama said today military options are still on the table. there are signs the u.s. might go along with a resolution if there is a consensus. we are seeing how people feel about foreign intervention. >> all over benghazi, there are posters say no foreign intervention is needed to help the people rid themselves of colonel gaddafi. if there clear about that. after several days of attacking protestors strongholds, several towns in the west, the town of ras lanuf, the rebels thought they had captured that themselves, only now are they beginning to change their mind. would you accept foreign help now? >> yes. the no-fly zone would be very welcome. the surgical bombings -- where he has his supporters. some other bases where he has his troops, we do not mind surgical bombing there. we did not mind a no-fly zone over libya because he is using his aircraft to kill people. they have no cover for that. we can match them on the ground, but in the skies, we have no power. we would welcome very much a no flying zone over libya. but no foreign troops on the ground. a no-fly zone w
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
's speech, i am joined by richard murphy, it was the former u.s. ambassador to syria. think ford joining the program. -- thank you for joining the program. the president said there would be impending reform, but did not give the reform the wanted to see at a few weeks later he was out of power. that is not the case the caseassad of syria. -- that is not the case with president assad of syria. am i think you are right, he is a person who has popularity. he is counting on both to carry him through. while his spokesperson a few days ago, monday i believe, said there would be a committee formed to study a series of reforms including lifting the emergency law, obviously, thus far the committee has said this is not the moment, given that the government is facing a most serious challenge that it has had since president assad became president in 2000. that is the protests and the bloodshed and government crackdowns continue, is there a tipping point or even that regime says enough is enough, we have to give some? >> i think it is possible they will come up with some reforms. he repeated that tod
gadhafi is under increased pressure from u.s. and international leaders, american warships on their way as a show of force. and questions about gadhafi's mental status following an interview he gave to christiane amanpour, first interview to reporters since the uprising began. >> they love me, all. >> reporter: if they do love you -- >> they will die to pro pekt me, my people. >> reporter: if you say they do love you, then why are they capturing bengazi -- >> it is al qaeda, it is al qaeda, not my people. al qaeda, yes. >> now, he laughed off the idea that he would ever leave libya, asking why would i leave my homeland? >>> in washington, u.s. ambassador to the united nations says gadhafi's comments seem, quote, delusional and some strong reaction among the opposition forces in libya who have taken over the city of benghazi. alex marquardt reports. >> reporter: this is hatred for gadhafi. the react to the interview with christiane amanpour ranged from disbelief to fury. >> everybody, even he lies, he knows he's lying and he knows people listening to him are aware he's lying. >> reporter
complain about u.s. policy. but he went a step further. he went on to demand the release in the united states of five convicted criminals, five people who were convicted in the united states in a country where we have due process, we have all the rights and all the rights that are provided to a defendant. five people who were convicted ofes upon yadge and one convicted of conspiracy to commit murder. former president carter did, did ask that those convicted in a court of law with all the due process that we have in this country for conspiracy to commit murder, he did ask and demand for their release, but did not ask or demand for the release of hundreds and hundreds of political providers who are rotting in prison while he was there. it's a sad day, mr. speaker. it's a sad day, i think for humanity. i know a lot of people who are listening are not surprised. i recall when the cuban dictator was gravely ill, it was reported that president carter wrote him a nice note hoping he would recover, hoping he would recover and would recover his health. and that now, again, former president cart
that if something like this happens in the u.s. that you'll have the ability, and i understand apparently from some of the testimony, what i've read is apparently you guys are in charge. in terms of implementing, you're the go-to people now? is that accurate in terms of dictating who does what and who's in charge? an ongoing plan that's developing? >> in response to nuclear power plant, the inside of the facility is regulated by nuclear regulatory commission. outside of the plant is actually the local and state responders with fema supporting them. if you have a scenario that resulted in release, the most important thing to occur is successfully evacuate people away from that plant. those the type of things that the exercise plans work on. these are the things that local and state officials train against, and our role of the federal government, to support them we additional resources required in the event of an evacuations had to take place. those are the thing, and i think from a standpoint of your question, if you would like senators to have our staff, reach out with the state and give your staff
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. we are ok. no problem. >> in the east, the air campaign had its first loss, a u.s. air force eagle jetfighter crashed in rebel territory. the alliance says it wasn't shot down but suffered mechanical failure. its two crewmen have been rescued. east of tripoli, the fight for control of the city goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic and retreat. >> the condition is so serious. since last night, they have no lights, electricity in the hospital. they're working with generators. yesterday it was disaster because more than 22 missiles. >> 1973 pact, no one to die. >> no one died last night. the libyan government insists they will swear many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes t might well be true. we have asked them for evidence. so far, they have not provided it. bbc news, tripoli. >> the american admiral leading the international operation to enforce the no-fly zone has said gaddafi loyalists are still attacking civilians and coalitions are considering options to stop that. on a diplomatic lev
. the u.s. stepped up their military campaign overnight firing more than 20 tomahawk cruise missiles at a weapons site at a storage facility in tripoli. >> for two days they've race -- they've raced back and forth. organized and supplies, their gains have proved agile while air strikes gave them confidence. their poeten as i is there even though they have lack of weapons. >> it's fair to say if we wanted to get weapons in libya, we probably could. we are looking at all our options at this point. >> in london a cavel kade of more than 40 countries met and planned what a post gaddafi libya might look like. some wondered if gaddafi could be persuaded into exile. but they are looking at upholding the resolution. >> the arms embargo applies to the whole of libya, though they might allow equipment to be given to people purely to defend themselves in a limited way. but we have not taken decision to do that. >> as gaddafi supporters celebrated yesterday's advances, this conflict is looking more finely balanced. anti-aircraft like these may dominate libyan skies but so far their mission has b
" -- one-on-one. abc's christiane amanpour gets answers from moammar gadhafi in a u.s. exclusive. >> he insists the libyan people do not oppose him, that they love him. it's tuesday, march 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. >>> moammar gadhafi's comments led to instant outrage from the white house and worldwide as opposition forces take down another libyan city. >> that interview is remarkable. it's like he has no real grasp what's happening outside his own -- >> his own mind, no comprehension of what's going on in the world, really. >> it really is a startling interview. stay tuned for that. >>> also ahead, convicted swindler bernie madoff's first recorded interview from prison. what he says about the billions lost and what has brought him to tears. some troubling things in terms of what he doesn't acknowledge even to this day. >> the lack of empathy for a lot of people watching that interview. >>> also coming up later, the smartphone app that helped a young driver beat a speeding ticket. see how
whether the u.s. military should arm the rebel forces. there's a lot of concern among some members of congress about who the rebels really are and whether decision to arm them could come back to bite in that respect for the u.s. there is a concern about whether garmin the rebels will be the right decision. -- arming the rebels will be the right decision. >> moussa koussa has arrived in libya having defected from the libyan regime. has there been any comment on this from the white house? quite strangely, the white house has been quiet on this issue. -- >> strangely, the white house has been quiet on this issue. that is surprising, really. we have not had any comment on this whatsoever. there is the issue as to whether the u.s. will arm rebel forces. the white house spokesperson has said that we are not ruling it out or in. the obama administration is fairly tight lid on this choice. this directive that was signed by president obama does not necessarily mean that the army has already taken place -- arming has already taken place. >> the u.n. security council has unanimously ordered s
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
be a solution, a fair solution on the palestinian issue. i think... with the u.s. saying whether it was going to have this hijacked or not, whether it's hijacked or not, one thing that is, i think, irreversible is that there is going to be a free press in all these countries. that is irreversible. and that... whatever the government says, that free press is going to demand a better implementation of agreement between israel and the arab countries. i understand that israel is buying egyptian guards cheaper than the egyptian consumer and 40% cheaper than the jordanians. i don't think the egyptians would like to... >> rose: well, there have also been stories that people in gaza were paying a lot more for things that came from israel than the people of israel were paying for them. >> well, that's inside israel, inside the occupation. but the egyptians are going to say how come we sell our goods to a neighbor-- no matter how friendly they are-- than to another neighbor, jordan, or to ourselves. that's very difficult to justify. >> would you speculate that it's more likely that freely-elected leade
. >> the president saying that u.s. ground force would not be part of that effort which apparently will be led by french and british soldiers. gadhafi's government has declared a cease-fire in an apparent bid to ward off strikes but that cease-fire apparently includes reports from rebels that they are still being shelved. two cities, including misrata reportedly still under attack. rebels in the eastern stronghold of benghazi are fortifying positions against a gadhafi attack and welcoming outside attack. >> gadhafi is not good. gadhaf is very, very dangerous. >> wait for france to bring battalion for the gadhafi forces and for us staying here we're waiting for our orders to move forward. >> course this action is in sharp contrast to the western response to events in yemen let alone u.s. supported dare i say it bank rolled allies like bahrain and saudi arabia who have been using our own weapons to crack down on their own people. their efforts met with stern words of warning from our country. joining us now lieutenant colonel tony shaf fer, former intelligence officer and with us from london phi
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> more now on libya from the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rise. she spoke to reporters for about 20 minutes at the white house before the daily briefing. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. as i mentioned this morning, we have with us today the united states ambassador to the united nations susan rice and was in a meeting with the president and u.n. secretary general and i would like her to speak about that meeting and she'll take questions from you and i'll step aside. thanks. >> thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i want to give you a brief readout of the president's meeting with the u.n. secretary general. as you might expect, significant portion of that meeting was devoted to discussing the situation in libya. the u.n. has played a positive and very important role in efforts to end the bloodshed there and hold the gaddafi regime accountable and support the libyan people. in libya, the united nations is demonstrating the indispensible role it can play in advancing our interests and defending ou
. there will be lots of different panel discussions across u.s. history. sunday night at 8:00 p.m., our guest is the president and ceo of the partnership for new york city. she is also a member of the federal reserve bank of new york. she will discuss the role of the federal reserve bank and other topics. thank you very much for being with us on an interesting friday morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the turn of events in libya today, the country has declared a cease-fire in their attacks on anti-government rebels, possibly in response to the action by the u.n. last night. the security council declared a no-fly zone of the country, voting authorize all necessary measures to protect the libyan people, including air strikes. the associated press reported about one hour ago that libya's foreign minister announced a ceasefire and stoppage of all military operations, saying it will take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans. he also criti
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
't make the mistake that the u.s. made in iraq. he didn't dismantle the military completely. >> rose: he dismantled the leadership. >> and brought in a new cadre of officers. and then he did something else. gradually he built a parallel military called the islamic revoluonary guard corps, the i.r.g.c. and with every passing year he strengthened them to the dret remit of the military. so we now have two military, one that is significant. >> so tell me your picture of iran today. i mean khamenei is the supreme leader. >> khamenei is the supreme leader. i think his space of power is essentially the i.r.g.c., the revolutionary guards. >> rose: and they're more loyal to him than they are to ahmadinejad or anyone else? >> they are more loyal to themselves, i think, right now because... >> rose: they're the power center. >> they're the power center. they've become an economic juggernaut. >> rose: they own things. >> they own about half the country. literally about half of the economy. >> rose: so therefore, it is argued, that sanctions can have an impact because sanctions can deny them their so
. it will air one hour later in usual due to the time difference between the u.s. and britain. you can see it 8:00 eastern live on c-span 2. next, rode to the white house. then a discussion on what is ahead for congress and the president. and then the former new hampshire senator and governor. monday night, a white house summit on bling featuring a report from president obama and -- who speaks on his own experiences. >> we remember what it is like to see kids picked on. i have to say with my baby years and the name that i have, i was not immune. but because it is something that happens a lot, it is something that has been around, sometimes we turn a blind eye to the problem. >> watch it monday night on 10:00 eastern on c-span 3. today on a road to the white house, c-span interviewed radio talk-show host herman cain on why he is likely to enter the gop race. this is about 45 minutes. about 45 minutes. >> why are you thinking about running for president? >> i am thinking about running for president for several reasons. reasons. my parents were able to achieve their dreams. they wanted to own a ho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)